Winter Bird Feeding at Daybreak Imagery, Part 2

Bird Feeders in snow outside Daybreak Imagery office windows

It’s snowing again today as I write this, and the birds are busy seeking out food that’s being quickly covered by the fluffy white stuff.  Richard’s in his photography blind again out by the juniper trees behind the birdbath.  With high gas prices, it’s nice that he doesn’t have a long commute to work.

We have several feeding stations around the yard with just about every type of feeder there is.  Some birds like to eat from the hanging tube style feeders and others prefer to sit on tray or hopper feeders.  Still others  eat the seeds we scatter on the ground for them or that fall below the hanging feeders.

About ten years ago when Richard was gone somewhere on a photo trip, I got frustrated with the squirrels eating more bird seeds than the birds.  I went to the Wild Birds Unlimited store in Swansea, Illinois and came home with two of their fancy feeder pole systems complete with squirrel baffles.  They did the trick!  Through the years, we’ve purchased several more of these pole systems so now most of our feeders are safe from squirrels and other nighttime feeder thieves like skunks, opossums, cats, and raccoons.  They seemed expensive at the time but probably not in the long run with the money we’ve saved from feeding small mammals—and from replacing the feeders that they damaged or destroyed!

Water in Winter

Eastern Bluebirds at bird bath in winter

Water is just as important to birds in winter as in summer because birds need to keep their feathers clean and groomed in order to fly.  We have an in-ground water feature (see photo at left) with a floating cattle tank heater to keep the water from freezing.

Northern Mockingbird drinking at heated bird bath in winter

We also use special bird bath heaters, such as in this  mockingbird photo, for standard pedestal bird baths.

Surprisingly, these baths are just as popular on the coldest day of the year as on the hottest one in summer!  When everything else is frozen, our bird baths are the only open water around and the birds know it.

Shelter in Winter

Birdfeeding area near evergreen trees

After Christmas each year, Richard takes our tree outside and uses it for shelter for the birds from cold winds and storms.  He places it on the south side of the cedar and spruce trees south of our office.

This offers additional winter cover for the birds and also shields the feeders from winds so the birds have a sheltered area to eat.  The tree in the foreground on the right side of this photo is a recycled Christmas tree propped up with rebar.  In a few months we’ll take it to Stephen A. Forbes State Park where it will be placed in the lake to enhance fish habitat.

Female Northern Cardinal in winter

Evergreens also provide winter shelter for birds to roost at night or just to get out of the cold.

Plus birds look pretty sitting in them when it snows!

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